As a physician, the amount of medically-related junk mail and spam that I receive is truly amazing. It seems like I recycle a tree every week from venerable and respected institutions claiming the have the best treatment for what ails my patients and that I really ought to be sending them all to their place. Most of these pamphlets are glossy and beautiful with photoshopped pictures of their doctors, who look like models, none with so much as a wrinkle or grey hair. I wonder how they do it since it seems my hair thins between cases. Last week the Cleveland Clinic let me know that they have the best heart surgery program in the country. Today Case Western told me that they’re the best. Since I can’t choose between the two, I guess I’ll just have to keep on operating on my own patients. Today I also received the inaugural issue of the Johns Hopkins Health Review: Volume 1, Issue 1.

This was no pamphlet, but a magazine resembling a miniature journal. Remember the journal we read sometime before everything was electronic? Beautifully decorated with tasteful graphics throughout, page 4 is a very impressive masthead that any organization should be proud to have associated with their name. Interestingly, the Johns Hopkins Health Review is not edited by a physician, but by the Director of University Communications. So, in this free publication, the marketing people are telling physicians, nurses, and whomever else is on the list of names they purchased, what the important topics of the day are and what they ought to know. It’s also their time to grandstand.

A beautifully crafted advertisement and political sounding board

A beautifully crafted advertisement and political sounding board

When I opened this masterful piece of advertising, the magazine spontaneously opened to the very middle and to the article called “Why Poverty Is Bad for All of Us”. In this piece of propaganda, Johns Hopkins has thinly veiled their left-wing progressive tendencies to remind us that social justice is required to make right all the ills in society. And, by the way, thanks to the wealthy the poor do not receive adequate health care. The bias is simply staggering, full of America bashing, and without any mention of the support America provides throughout the world.

While there is a forum for this discussion, I’m not sure this publication, presumably geared towards health care providers of all kinds, is the time and place. How does this contribute to finding solutions to the current health care crisis? Johns Hopkins should move along and push their political agenda elsewhere…leave us out of it. We already have politicians trying to control our medical practice one stinkin’ regulation at a time. Do we really need Johns Hopkins attacking from another angle? One thing is for sure: Johns Hopkins will never get a referral from me or my practice and I’ll take my business elsewhere when and if I need additional expert surgical opinion.

If only my real mailbox had a spam folder.

Physician and patient rights disappear when the government becomes involved in your care

Physician and patient rights disappear when the government becomes involved in your care

This is where physicians and their patients will end up

This is where physicians and their patients will end up, no matter who is in charge

Is Dr. Carson (Professor Emeritus, John Hopkins) right?

Is Dr. Carson (Professor Emeritus, John Hopkins) right?